Selling your privacy for ‘free’ services

Selling your privacy for ‘free’ services

Selling your privacy for ‘free’ services.

Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram… Chances are that most people are a user of at least one of these social media sites.

However, when signing up for a social media account, most users are more concerned about which profile picture to choose, than about reading the seemingly endless terms of service document. And what they fail to realise is that by accepting the terms of service, they are effectively forming a legal contract between themselves and the social network in question.

“It’s interesting how people are so concerned about their privacy, but are essentially giving it away for free,” says Robert Brown, CEO of DRS, a Cognosec AB company. “And once you are in the cycle of exchanging your privacy for ‘free’ services, there is no getting out. People need to realise that there is no free lunch.”

He says unless the user is a lawyer, or a privacy advocate, they will most likely just click the ‘agree’ button. “A few might give the terms a cursory scroll through, but almost no-one reads the fine print when they register for these sites.”

Originally privacy policies were aimed at protecting the users, but this is no longer the case. “These days, these policies, while not giving direct ownership of the user’s data to the social network, effectively give them a broad licence to use any of the data, be it posts or pictures.”

Take Instagram for example. Under the ‘Rights’ section of its terms of service, it states:

“Instagram does not claim ownership of any Content that you post on or through the Service. Instead, you hereby grant to Instagram a non-exclusive, fully paid and royalty-free, transferable, sub-licensable, worldwide license to use the Content that you post on or through the Service, subject to the Service’s Privacy Policy, available here including but not limited to sections 3 (“Sharing of Your Information”), 4 (“How We Store Your Information”), and 5 (“Your Choices About Your Information”). You can choose who can view your Content and activities, including your photos, as described in the Privacy Policy.”

Similarly, Facebook’s terms of service clearly state:

“We collect the content and other information you provide when you use our Services, including when you sign up for an account, create or share, and message or communicate with others. This can include information in or about the content you provide, such as the location of a photo or the date a file was created. We also collect information about how you use our Services, such as the types of content you view or engage with or the frequency and duration of your activities.”

All social media sites will have similar terms of service, essentially giving them the right to use all the user’s shared and posted content, with zero liability to the network. “The average person would be dismayed to discover that all these policies are the same in essence, and they are giving the full license to all the information you put into their service. You are effectively giving up ownership and control of your personal data, messages, posts and pictures, to a company that will use that data for their own benefit,” says Brown.

Moreover, he says social media networks continually use your data in order for advertisers to more effectively target users. “Have you ever wondered why an advert for something you were recently looking for online suddenly pops up in your Facebook ads? Wonder no more. When you look at the permissions you granted Facebook when installing the mobile app, you might be astonished to see you have given them the right to collect data from all devices on which you have the application, and are allowing it to collect data on the location of your device, language, time zone and suchlike.”

Ultimately, he says people need to be far more circumspect about the permissions they give, the terms and services they accept, and most importantly, the information they share online. “These sites track your every move as a means to promote goods and services in a very targeted way. So-called ‘free’ services can only exist by monetising their data, and selling advertising. They are not free. People are paying for these services with their personal data, and ultimately their privacy. Personal data has become the de facto product, and alongside it, the privacy itself.”

Edited by Fundisiwe Maseko
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Thomson Reuters launches Eikon Mobile App in Africa

Thomson Reuters launches Eikon Mobile App in Africa

Thomson Reuters launches Eikon Mobile App in Africa. (image source: Thomson Reuters)

Thomson Reuters has announced the launch of the Thomson Reuters Eikon mobile app to give their customers in Africa access and instant connection to financial analysis. According to the company, the Eikon mobile app will have the same comprehensive financial analysis as the desktop version but with greater agility.

“The World Bank and technology giants report that Sub-Saharan Africa remains the region with the highest growth rate in mobile subscriptions globally and as the company at the forefront of innovation and customer centricity, Thomson Reuters has launched the Eikon mobile app continuing to lead digital trends and meet customer needs,” said Euvin Naidoo, head of Financial Institutions for Africa at Thomson Reuters.

Thomson Reuters Eikon provides easy access to trusted news, data, and analytics, all filtered by relevance to a customer’s exact needs, and displayed in a highly visual way that is easy to grasp and act on.

“From the intuitive Eikon mobile app, Thomson Reuters customers can now instantly connect to new and emerging markets, deep and varied pools of liquidity, professional networks and expert support – anywhere, anytime. This will enable our customers to get first hand comprehensive financial analysis, through which they’ll discover more opportunities and be able to make crucial decisions with confidence,” Naidoo adds.

According to research from Thomson Reuters, 62% of all digital media time is spent on mobile devices and 90% of that digital time is spent on apps.

Edited by Fundisiwe Maseko
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New SES VP of Sales to expand video business in Africa

New SES VP of Sales to expand video business in Africa

Clint Brown, Vice President, Sales and Market Development for Africa at SES.

On Monday 19 January 2018, SES Video announced the appointment of Clint Brown as the new Vice President, Sales and Market Development, for Africa. The appointment forms part of SES’s strategy to bolster its video growth strategy across Africa and continue to support video and media customers in the region.

Clint Brown comes to SES with over 15 years of industry experience and is responsible for leading SES Video’s commercial activities in Africa to expand the video business in the region. To that end, his main focus will be to continue to help accelerating the digital switchover, support broadcasters in increasing their channel line-ups and content providers in growing their audience, as well as enable mobile operators to diversify their offerings and leverage their networks for video delivery.

Before joining SES, Brown served as the Sales Director at Avanti Communications Group plc, overseeing the development of all aspects of the business throughout the Southern Africa region. He has held a range of leading roles in marketing, sales, and business development for companies such as Harris CapRock Communications (now Speedcast) and Airbus Defence and Space.

Ferdinand Kayser, CEO of SES Video, said: “We are delighted to welcome Clint to the SES Video team. With a regional presence in four offices across Africa, Clint and his sales team will continue to drive the expansion of SES’s video business in the region by further supporting the digital switchover, helping our customers increase their reach and enabling new businesses to enter the video world.”

Edited by Dean Workman
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Nigerian e-library startup Panacea launches Android app

Nigerian e-library startup Panacea launches Android app

Nigerian e-library startup Panacea launches Android app.

Nigerian e-library startup, Panacea, has announced that it has launched an Android app version of the platform, which allows users to rent books, search for study mates and create book clubs.

Panacea, which was launched for author registration and uploads in July 2017, has launched the beta version of its Android app which will see all the accepted research works, textbooks, novels, short stories, theses and professional texts available for rent via the new mobile app.

“Panacea seeks to make learning fun and rewarding by making books more readily accessible to students, researchers and personal development enthusiasts while generating consistent revenue for authors and publishers through a global community of readers,” chief operating officer (COO) Philip Amiola told Disrupt Africa.

“Our books are offered in an encrypted digital format that enhances a great reading experience while preventing piracy and duplication, thus guaranteeing maximum profit for authors and publishers,” according to Amiola

The startup’s aim is to solve the problem of accessibility to and affordability of books and resources, giving users the flexibility to acquire knowledge from the comfort of their homes and offices. Panacea currently has around 150 user registrations on the platform from 5 different countries within and outside Africa.

“We intend to attract authors and users from Africa and around the world in the coming months, especially African authors and readers,” said Amiola.

The subscription-based platform does offer some free resources, but requires users to pay to access premium books and publications. The app is available for download on the Google Play Store.

Edited by Dean Workman
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The future of learning is here

The future of learning is here

The future of learning is here.

Employee expectations regarding organisational learning mirror their experiences in how they consume content outside of work. In a study conducted by CEB of over 90K learners, 77% of employees reported they do what they need to do to learn effectively. 69% of employees regularly seek out new ways of doing their work from their co-workers and 66% of employees expect to learn just-in-time.

Learning and development (L&D) teams are now trying to meet the demands of today’s corporate digital learner who is impatient, tech-savvy, disrupted and on the go. Yet most existing L&D efforts don’t engage this type of learner. Historically the focus has been on redesigning content to make it more enjoyable and engaging by leveraging formats like virtual, and e-learning. But with the wake of the Modern Learner, L&D teams are realising that making content better doesn’t solve for the demands to make the learning experience effortless, continuous and personalised to each persons’ needs anytime, anywhere.

Organisations that encourage their employees to share their knowledge through blogs and Wiki’s have found increased levels of engagement as these employees experience a greater sense of belonging as a result of their contributions. It is also a way of retaining knowledge within the organisation when employees who have shared their knowledge leave the organisation.

The point is, L&D in the past has been a one-way street and HR applications have traditionally been designed to place the burden of strategy and execution on HR & L&D. But as I speak to customers who have migrated to modern HCM applications, the secret sauce lies in cultivating a strategy and platform that puts accountability into the workforce, front-line managers and leadership. A successful learning platform will empower the entire workforce to produce engaging content, make learning enjoyable and be intelligent enough to know what all users expects to learn next.

The concept of spending hours, days and weeks on training courses and then finding that they only remember approximately 20% of what has been taught and much of what they learn has become redundant within a short period of time due to ever-changing technology and processes is unappealing to today’s learner. They are accustomed to learning what they need to know from the likes of YouTube and TED videos where relevant information is given in short (5-10 minute videos) and is available whenever they need it.

Oracle understands that people don’t want to be trained all the time, they want to train themselves and are positioned to thrive in a digital communal setting that traps and evolves their knowledge over time. That’s what’s most compelling about Oracle’s Learning Cloud is that it has delivered innovation to do just this. With Oracle, HR and L&D can:

  • Engage the Modern Learner: meet the demands of the workforce with effortless learning that’s personalised and accessible anytime, anywhere
  • Make Learning Relevant 24/7: enable continuous knowledge transfer with recommended content and easy content discovery via peer-to-peer content posting and sharing
  • Blend Traditional with Modern: easily manage and deliver content using flexible tools and embed learning into HR talent processes

We’ve reimagined learning to be just like the consumer experience, if not better. Where the system leverages adaptive intelligence to generate recommended content based on job profile and behaviour resulting in an always-on personalised experience anytime, anywhere. SMEs and employees can easily capture, share ideas and best practices to enable knowledge transfer across the entire workforce resulting in a social, collaborative enterprise-wide learning experience. In return employees, are now empowered more than ever to manage their reputation and be recognised for the impact of their contributions while HR will have real-time insights into content consumption trends and key influencers – a win-win for everyone in my humble opinion.

By Ronnie Toerien, HCM Sales Development and Strategy leader, Oracle Africa

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Google removes “View Image” button: Here’s how to get it back

Google removes “View Image” button: Here’s how to get it back

Google removes “View Image” button: Here’s how to get it back.

On Friday 16 January 2018 Google had made a few changes to the way Image Search works on the search engine. However, one of the biggest changes was the removal of the “View Image” button, which would take a user straight to the image and the image’s URL.

Danny Sullivan, Google’s public search liaison, tweeted about the change on February 16. His Tweet read:

Today we’re launching some changes on Google Images to help connect users and useful websites. This will include removing the View Image button. The Visit button remains, so users can see images in the context of the webpages they’re on. pic.twitter.com/n76KUj4ioD

— Google SearchLiaison (@searchliaison) February 15, 2018

With the “View Image” button disabled, users will now have to visit the hosting website of the image in order to view or download the image. This will in-turn generate more visitors for websites hosting sought-after images.

After the removal of the “View Image” button was implemented, Google faced a backlash from users on social media.

So Google have just made getting good reference more difficult by getting rid of the ‘view image’ option.. Bit of a nightmare for an illustrator.. Nice one..

— Bill McConkey (@bill_mcconkey) February 19, 2018

Removal of the ‘View Image’ button from Google Image search makes it annoying ! What do you think? #SEO #Google #SEM #DigitalMarketing #onlinemarketing

— Nishit Poddar (@iTechCracker) February 19, 2018

Google has removed “view image” button. Another step to make internet more closed. #Internet #Copyright #DontBeEvil pic.twitter.com/x2Ve4ptVEF

— 4r4g0rn (@evilripper) February 19, 2018

A way to get it back:
With backlash increasing over the removal of the function, Google quickly developed workaround extensions for both Google Chrome and Firefox. These workaround extensions bring the “View Image” button back to these two browsers. The extension for Google Chrome and Firefox can be found by clicking on the links.

By: Darryl Linington
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Study: South African business lag global peers in leveraging technology

Study: South African business lag global peers in leveraging technology

South African business lag global peers in leveraging technology to integrate into customers lives-study

According to Accenture Technology Vision 2018, South African businesses wanting to leverage the power of technology to transform themselves into intelligent enterprises that can integrate into people’s daily lives must embrace five key trends.

This year’s report by New York-listed Accenture surveyed more than 6,000 businesses across 19 industries in 25 countries including South Africa, making it the largest-ever sample size in the history of the report. Accenture Technology Vision 2018 highlights how rapid advances in technologies — including artificial intelligence (AI), advanced analytics and the cloud — are enabling companies to not just create innovative products and services, but change the way people work and live.

“South African businesses and IT executives are increasingly embracing the power of technology with 80% of those surveyed agreeing that it can help companies weave themselves seamlessly into the fabric of daily life,” says Willie Schoeman, Managing Director for Accenture Technology in Africa. “Many people may not even realise that they are interacting with new innovations like AI. If you’ve received an automated telemarketing call or interacted with a Chabot online then AI has already influenced your life.”

Amazon, Apple and Microsoft are good examples of how companies can use the power of technology to integrate into their customers’ lives, not only through the company’s extensive online presence but also through its Echo device and AI assistant Alexa. Schoeman says an excellent local example of a company that is successfully integrating itself into customers’ lives through the power of technology is Discovery. By embedding its Vitality programme into its insurance products it encourages its customers to interact with the company by rewarding them for positive behaviour.

Given the wave of technological change sweeping the globe, the Accenture Technology Vision 2018 report identifies five emerging technology trends that companies must address if they are to build the partnerships needed to succeed in today’s digital economy:

1. Citizen AI: Raising AI to Benefit Business and Society

As artificial intelligence grows in its capabilities—and its impact on people’s lives—businesses must move to “raise” their AI presence to act as responsible, productive members of society. The report shows that 72% of South African executives agree that in the next two years, AI will work alongside humans in their organisations as a co-worker, collaborator and trusted advisor. This is slightly lower than the global average of 81%. Nevertheless, 78% of South African executives report that their organisations seek to gain customer trust and confidence by being transparent in their AI-based decisions and actions, compared to 72% globally.

2. Extended Reality: The End of Distance
Virtual and augmented reality technologies are removing the distance to people, information, and experiences, transforming the ways people live and work. Only 54% of South African executives believe it will be important or very important to leverage XR (cross reality) solutions to close the gap of physical distance when engaging with employees and customers. While this is far lower than the global average of 80%, Accenture says this is likely due to the lower connectivity and computer literacy levels in the country, which means local managers are still focussed on other challenges. This is probably why only 13% of South African executives state it is very important for their organisations to be a pioneer in XR solutions compared to a global average of 27%. However, the local mining and engineering industries are more likely to adopt XR (60%) compared to others such as consumer goods (30%). For example, the heavy engineering industry uses remote experts to assist fieldworkers to repair vehicles.

3. Data Veracity: The Importance of Trust
By transforming themselves to run on data, businesses have created a new kind of vulnerability: inaccurate, manipulated, and biased data that leads to corrupted business insights, and skewed decisions. A fairly large portion of South African executives (73%) agree with their global counterparts (79%) that organisations are basing their most critical systems and strategies on data, yet many have not invested in the capabilities to verify the truth within it.

4. Frictionless Business: Built to Partner at Scale
Businesses depend on technology-based partnerships for growth, but their own legacy systems aren’t designed to support partnerships at scale. Only 18% of South African businesses report working with double or more partners than they were two years ago. This is half the global average of 36%. Schoeman says many South African companies are still using legacy systems that were not built to support the technology-based partnerships that underpin how companies currently interact with clients and competitors. Companies that invest in microservices architectures and use blockchain and smart contracts to build strong technology-based partnerships will be the ones that redefine how businesses transact in the future. At present, only 31% of South African executives state that blockchain and smart contracts will be critical or very critical to their organisations over the next three years versus a global average of 60%.

5. Internet of Thinking: Creating Intelligent Distributed Systems

Businesses are making big bets on intelligent environments via robotics, AI and immersive experiences. But to bring these intelligent environments to life, they must extend their infrastructures into the dynamic, real-world environments they want to reach. A mere 33% of South African executives believe it will be critical over the next two years to leverage customer hardware and hardware accelerators to meet the computing demands of intelligent environments versus a global average of 63%. Robotics, immersive reality, artificial intelligence and connected devices are bringing a new level of technological sophistication to the physical world. Current predictions suggest that by 2020, smart sensors and other Internet of Things devices will generate at least 507.5 zettabytes of data. This will necessitate the development of special-purpose and customizable hardware to support real-time systems requirements.

Edited by Fundisiwe Maseko
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MTN still owes $609 million of Nigerian mega fine

MTN still owes $609 million of Nigerian mega fine

Prof. Umar Garba Danbatta is the Executive Vice Chairman and Chief Executive Office (EVC/CEO) of the Nigerian Communications Commission.

On Thursday 15 February 2018, Prof. Umar Danbatta, executive vice chairman of the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC), revealed that MTN Nigeria still needed to pay USD $609,451 million (N220 billion) into the coffers of the federal government to settle the USD $914 million (N330 billion) fine imposed on the telecoms group for not disconnecting unregistered SIM cards. This is according to a report by Nigerian Communications Week.

The NCC confirmed that the telecom giant has paid a total of USD $304 million (N110 billion) out of the record fine. Danbatta revealed this at a workshop on Code of Corporate Governance organised by the commission in Kano.

MTN Nigeria was originally fined USD $2.8 billion (N1.04 trillion) in October 2015 for failing to deactivate more than 5 million unregistered SIM cards. The fine was later reduced to N330 billion after prolonged negotiation with both the regulatory agency and the federal government.

The settlement also paved the way for MTN to list its subsidiary on the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE). Danbatta said on Thursday that the matter had been resolved with an agreement for settlement over a three-year period signed between the agency and MTN.

He said the payment was spread over a three-year period because the intention was not to snuff the life out of MTN.

The NCC boss said, “Current evaluation report of the state of the industry suggests that whilst not understating the impact of other external and fiscal issues confronting the sector, that most challenges negatively affecting the health of operators in the sector today are attributable to poor governance issues.”

“It is currently rejigging its regulatory oversights in the areas of ensuring that consumers get cost-effective value for money spent on telecommunication services; and that service delivery by providers are qualitative and efficient,” he concluded.

Edited by Dean Workman
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6 myths about Cloud busted – A quick guide for SMEs

6 myths about Cloud busted – A quick guide for SMEs

Six myths about Cloud busted – A quick guide for SMEs.cloud

There’s so much to think about when you’re launching or running your small business, but there’s no doubt that building an effective technology solution is key to its success.

However, technology evolves quickly – and chances are that you can’t keep track of what’s changed, simply because you’re focused on the business of, well, your business, and not on the solutions that could step your business up.

Ignite, a Cloud service provider busts some common myths to save you the time researching your next technology decisions.

Myth: My business doesn’t need to move to the Cloud – our current systems work just fine.
Busted: We are living in the era of Cloud computing, because Cloud applications can handle so much more than older systems. The Cloud makes use of networks that you can access anytime, on any device, at any location, meaning that your business can continue uninterrupted no matter what happens. This means you’re no longer vulnerable because all your information is on one computer that can be stolen, or on one server that could be struck by lightning or blown by electricity surges.

Myth: My business is small, and none of the big ISPs will be interested in taking me on as a client.
Busted: There are ISPs to meet the needs of businesses of any size. For example, Ignite’s ecosystem of products and services contains everything a small business may need, enabling it to provide you with a comprehensive bundled solution. From super-fast fibre to a collaborative Office 365 solution, Ignite can provide the right cloud solution for your business. In addition to that, there are no long-term commitments or contracts and you can cancel or change your service at any time directly online, enabling you to choose a solution which can be altered as your business grows.

Myth: My business can’t afford to move to Cloud.
Busted: Cloud hosting solutions are economical because you don’t need to take on the extravagant expense of purchasing and maintaining a server. Many ISPs include support in their deal as well, meaning you can ask for help with a phone call or an email, if you ever need it. What’s more, using a virtual server means that your business can access the exact products, software, services and storage you need – and you can upscale or downsize them as your business needs evolve.

Myth: Cloud computing isn’t secure enough for my business.
Busted: Contrary to what some business owners still believe, Cloud computing –  when making use of a premium, trusted provider – is much more secure than managing data in-house. Providers usually have massive data centres that are equipped with state-of-the-art security systems and software guarded by 24-hour security. They also have backups and generators to ensure that your data isn’t affected by any natural disaster, hacking or human error.

Myth: I’ve just bought enough data storage to last me for years.
Busted: As your small business grows, so too will your storage requirements. Increasing your onsite storage is expensive and requires a lot of guessing as it’s incredibly difficult to determine future data needs. With a Cloud hosting provider you can easily and quickly increase your required storage as well as add the new features and depth of data management as required. When signing with a Cloud hosting provider, you usually pay a monthly subscription that allows you to change or cancel your subscription without having to pay a costly penalty.

Myth: Different applications need different management systems, making cloud complicated.
Busted: Using Internet Solutions’ Skylight portal means you can set up and manage different workloads on different clouds, monitor performance, and view real time reports across all the cloud platforms you use – even those from other service providers. It’s completely possible to have one view of all your cloud services, making it much easier to control your entire virtual environment.

Whether you’re a brick and mortar business, a service provider or an online start-up, operating in a rapidly changing technology world, there’s simply no time or space for complacency if you’re going to keep up with the pack – or even better, lead it. Making sure that you understand all that Cloud computing can do for you and your business is a great next step.

Edited By: Darryl Linington
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Mobility Centre for Africa set to advance the future of mobility

Mobility Centre for Africa set to advance the future of mobility

Mobility Centre for Africa set to advance the future of mobility.

The Mobility Centre for Africa NPC (MCA) hosted it’s 3rd Future Mobility Roundtable in Cape Town on 13 February 2018. The discussion, held at the Westin Hotel was the 3rd in a series of events bringing together government, industry and academia to collaborate in a drive to prepare South Africa and the continent at large for the rapidly changing world of transportation. Victor Radebe, Executive Director and MCA Co-founder stated that, “As a tech-savvy nation, the only way we can proactively manage the mobility disruptive forces is to first develop a conducive legislative and policy environment; and government’s role cannot be overemphasised”.

Global ride-sharing company, Uber, was MCA’s official partner for the 3rd Future Mobility Roundtable.  Alon Lits, General Manager, Sub-Saharan Africa, for Uber, during his presentation on Future of Urban Mobility – Autonomous and Flying Cars stated, “We started in 2009 to solve a simple problem – how do you get a ride at the touch of a button? Eight years and over two billion trips later, we’ve started tackling an even greater challenge: reducing congestion and pollution in our cities by getting more people into fewer cars.

The 3rd Mobility Roundtable was preceded by two events hosted in Durban and Johannesburg last year. The 1st Future Mobility Roundtable was hosted at the Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban on the 5th October 2017 where the MCA was envisaged to be a platform for the research, testing and deployment of future Smart Mobility Solutions including electric, connected and autonomous vehicle technology. The 2nd Future Mobility Roundtable was hosted on the 27th November 2017 at the IDC Conference Centre in Sandton, bringing together transport and mobility experts who shared insights on the future of mobility on the continent.

The 3rd Future Mobility Roundtable focused on addressing the legislative and policy framework required to support the deployment of new mobility solutions. MCA Executive Director, Victor Radebe opened the conference by setting the scene through a reflection of the global trends in the future of Connected, Autonomous, Shared and Electric (CASE) Mobility. The keynote address was delivered by Prasanth Mohan, Chief Director: Road Infrastructure and Industry Development at the National Department of Transport. The speaker line-up included the Consular General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Bonnie Horbach who presented on Netherlands Innovation: Europe’s gateway to smart mobility. Uber duo, Yolisa Kani and Antoine Aubert gave a presentation on Regulatory Reform for Effective Shared Mobility while the presentation on Legislative and Policy Environment the National Department of Transport’s Abram Chego.

Smart Mobility Expert at the Mobility Centre for Africa, Ivan Reutener, gave a presentation on 2018 Future Mobility Trends while Funzani Mathivha, with Managing Director of Inteshield Information Security Products and Services, presenting Privacy and Cyber-security for Connected Vehicles. Andile Skosana, Technical Director – Urban and Regional Planning at Aurecon gave a presentation on Planning Policies for the New Ecosystem: Complementary philosophies for land use and transport planning. Royal HaskoningDHV Netherlands Smart Mobility Specialist, Peter Morsink, discussed Global Legislative Responses to Emerging Mobility Solutions – UK, US and EU case studies.

The event’s presentations were rounded off by the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications’ Duncan Mutengwe who presented Compulsory Specifications and Homologation of Vehicles, while Stellenbosch University’s Prof Stephan Krygsman gave a presentation on the Evolution of Fuel-based Vehicle Taxation to Electric Vehicles.

Manfred Uken from the Mobility Centre for Africa summed up the day’s deliberations and way forward by reiterating Victor Radebe’s call for collaboration between Government, Industry and Academia to join the MCA as they plan the future of mobility.

Edited By: Darryl Linington
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